Supping with the Puritans – Marrow and fatness shared with ‘the prince of letter writers’


Isaiah 33:17

GNV

17 Thine eyes shall see the King in his glory: they shall behold the land far off.
 


 


“Put the beauty of ten thousand worlds of paradises, like the Garden of Eden in one; put all trees, all flowers, all smells, all colors, all tastes, all joys, all loveliness, all sweetness in one. O what a fair and excellent thing would that be? And yet it would be less to that fair and dearest well-beloved Christ than one drop of rain to the whole seas, rivers, lakes, and foundations of ten thousand earths.”

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Samuel Rutherford

Source: Joel Beeke, “Why You Should Read the Puritans”


Photo: Stephencdickson
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Not having been written by the finger of God, the inscription on Samuel’s gravestone is fading. The Lord now writes on tablets of human hearts.

 

Quotes of the day – Comfort


Isaiah 40:1

nkjv

“Comfort, yes, comfort My people!”
Says your God.

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Isaiah 12:1

And in that day you will say:

“O Lord, I will praise You;
Though You were angry with me,
Your anger is turned away, and You comfort me.


Anwoth Old Kirk. Samuel Rutherford was the minister here from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt - own work, May 1997, Wikimedia

Anwoth Old Kirk. Samuel Rutherford was the minister here from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt – own work, May 1997, Wikimedia.

The epitaph on his tombstone includes ‘Acquainted with Emmanuel’s Love’ – Wikipedia.


Comfort

“. . .whether God come to his children with a rod or a crown, if he come himself with it, it is well. Welcome, welcome Jesus, what way soever thou come, if we can get a sight of thee. And sure I am, it is better to be sick, providing Christ come to the bed-side, and draw aside the curtains, and say ‘Courage, I am thy salvation,’ than to enjoy health, being lusty and strong, and never to be visited of God.”

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“Do not focus your thoughts among the confused wheels of secondary causes, as – O if this had been, this had not followed!’ Look up to the master motion of the first wheel. In building, we see hewn stones and timbers under hammers and axes, yet the house in this beauty we do not see at the present, but it is in the mind of this builder. We also see unbroken clods, furrows, and stones, but we do not see the summer lilies, roses, and the beauty of a garden. Even so we do not presently see the outcome of God’s decrees with his blessed purpose. It is hard to believe when his purpose is hidden and under the ground. Providence has a thousand keys to deliver his own even when all hope is gone. Let us be faithful and care for our own part, which is to do and suffer for him, and lay Christ’s part on himself and leave it there; duties are ours, events are the Lord’s.”

Samuel Rutherford

 

A word in season – Jesus Christ


Anwoth Old Kirk. Samuel Rutherford was the minister here from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt - own work, May 1997, Wikimedia

John 6

35 And Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life. He who comes to Me shall never hunger, and he who believes in Me shall never thirst. 36 But I said to you that you have seen Me and yet do not believe. 37 All that the Father gives Me will come to Me, and the one who comes to Me I will by no means cast out. 38 For I have come down from heaven, not to do My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me. 39 This is the will of the Father who sent Me, that of all He has given Me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up at the last day. 40 And this is the will of Him who sent Me, that everyone who sees the Son and believes in Him may have everlasting life; and I will raise him up at the last day.”

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Anwoth Old Kirk, where Samuel Rutherford was minister from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt photo, May 1997, Wikimedia.


 

Crying Out to God in Prayer

Take hope and pray! Even our sighs He hears, and “Tears have a tongue, and grammar, and language, that our Father knoweth.”

Purely Presbyterian

crying-out-to-god-in-prayerSamuel Rutherford

The Trial and Triumph of Faith

Sermon VI, pp. 66-73

 And, behold, a woman of Canaan came out of the same coasts, and cried unto him, saying, Have mercy on me, O Lord, thou son of David; my daughter is grievously vexed with a devil. (Mat. 15:22)

In her prayer, as it is expressed by Matthew, we have, 1st, The manner of it: “she cried.” 2nd, The compellation, or party to whom she prayeth: “O, Lord, thou Son of David.” 3rd, The petition: “have mercy upon me.” 4th, The reason: “for my daughter is vexed with a devil.”

“She cried.” The poor woman prayed (as we say) with good will, with a bent of affection. Why is crying used in praying? Had it not been more modesty to speak to this soul-redeeming Saviour, who heareth sometimes before we pray, than to cry out and shout?—for the disciples…

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Quote of the day – Samuel Rutherford

 

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Anwoth Old Kirk. Samuel Rutherford was the minister here from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt - own work, May 1997, Wikimedia

Anwoth Old Kirk. Samuel Rutherford was the minister here from 1627 to 1638, Mick Garratt – own work, May 1997, Wikimedia

“It is not for us to set an hourglass to the Creator of time.”

Samuel Rutherford

Source: Christianity.com, Samuel Rutherford’s Lasting Legacy

(Good short article with resources.)

HT: Our Reformed Christian Heritage, Angela Wittman

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Do you have any ideas for putting Rutherford’s words into our everyday English…? Comment if you want to!