A word in season – Paul on repentance


Brothers and sisters, I’m not trying to bait anyone but to finish a discussion. Thank you!

2 Corinthians 7:8-10

NKJV

For though I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it; though I did regret it—for I see that that letter caused you sorrow, though only for a while— I now rejoice, not that you were made sorrowful, but that you were made sorrowful to the point of repentance; for you were made sorrowful according to the will of God, so that you might not suffer loss in anything through us. 10 For the sorrow that is according to the will of God produces a repentance without regret, leading to salvation, but the sorrow of the world produces death.

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HT: Thanks for the reminder, Sherry!

“Why Repentance Is Needed For Salvation”


Easton’s Bible Dictionary

Repentance

Biblestudytools.com

There are three Greek words used in the New Testament to denote repentance.

The verb metamelomai is used of a change of mind, such as to produce regret or even remorse on account of sin, but not necessarily a change of heart. This word is used with reference to the repentance of Judas ( Matthew 27:3).

Metanoeo, meaning to change one’s mind and purpose, as the result of after knowledge. This verb, with (3) the cognate noun metanoia, is used of true repentance, a change of mind and purpose and life, to which remission of sin is promised.

Evangelical repentance consists of (1) a true sense of one’s own guilt and sinfulness; (2) an apprehension of God’s mercy in Christ; (3) an actual hatred of sin ( Psalms 119:128 ; Job 42:5 Job 42:6 ; 2 co 7:10 ) and turning from it to God; and (4) a persistent endeavour after a holy life in a walking with God in the way of his commandments.

The true penitent is conscious of guilt ( Psalms 51:4 Psalms 51:9 ), of pollution ( Psalms 51:5 Psalms 51:7 Psalms 51:10 ), and of helplessness ( 51:11 ; Psalms 109:21 Psalms 109:22 ). Thus he apprehends himself to be just what God has always seen him to be and declares him to be. But repentance comprehends not only such a sense of sin, but also an apprehension of mercy, without which there can be no true repentance ( Psalms 51:1 ; 130:4 ).


See, Gracious God, Before Thy Throne

A wonderful hymn that teaches us how to pray in this time of need.

Christian in Canada

Mount Robson Park

See, gracious God, before Thy throne
Thy mourning people bend!
’Tis on Thy sovereign grace alone,
Our humble hopes depend.

Tremendous judgments from Thy hand,
Thy dreadful power display:
Yet mercy spares this guilty land,
And yet we live to pray.

Great God, and why this nation spare,
Ungrateful as we are?
O be these awful warnings heard,
While mercy cries, “Forebear.”

What numerous crimes increasing rise,
Where Satan shows his smile?
What land so favored of the skies,
And yet what land so vile?

How changed, alas! are truths divine,
For error, guilt and shame!
What impious numbers, bold in sin,
Disgrace the Christian name!

O bid us turn, almighty Lord,
By Thy resistless grace;
Then shall our hearts obey Thy word,
And humbly seek Thy face.

Then should insulting foes invade,
We shall not sink in fear;
Secure of never failing aid,
If God, our God, is near.

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Confession of Sin, Illustrated from Court Cases

What does repentance look like?

Scripture Thoughts

Understanding the Christian worldview through looking at contemporary events is often helpful, providing good application of Bible truth to the “real world”– as observed from time to time in Christian blog topics.  While reading a recent Spurgeon sermon, number 641 (from July 1865), I was reminded of a Pyromaniacs blog post on this same topic a few years ago:  relating “real world” news events to Christian doctrine, through a look at high profile news cases of criminals and their confessions.  The Pyromaniacs post considered a few issues in reference to the rape/murder confession of John Gardner III in California a few years ago.  Spurgeon in 1865 included two news events of criminal cases in a sermon that contrasted the two very different confessions as “types” of two types of people in their attitude of repentance and confession before God.

The first example noted by Spurgeon is the type we…

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