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Zwingli’s Discussion on Images and the Mass — CrossTheBorder.org

 



Christ’s Death — Zwingli’ s Fundamental Position — Iconoclasts — Hottinger — Zwingli on Image-worship — Conference of all Switzerland summoned — 900 Members Assemble — Preliminary Question — The Church — Discussion on Images — Books that Teach Nothing — The Mass Discussed — It is Overthrown — Joy of Zwingli — Relics Interred. […]

“The images were still retained in the churches, and mass still formed part of the public worship. Zwingli now began to prepare the public mind for a reform in both particulars — to lead men from the idol to the one true God; from the mass which the Church had invented to the Supper which Christ had instituted. . .”

via Zwingli’s Discussion on Images and the Mass — CrossTheBorder.org


 

Quote of the day – Huldrych Zwingli


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The murder of Zwingli by Karl Jauslin (1842–1904)

The murder of Zwingli by Karl Jauslin (1842–1904)

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“The Christian life, then, is a battle, so sharp and full of danger that effort can nowhere be relaxed without loss. . .”

Huldrych Zwingli, AZ Quotes
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A little about Zwingli

In 1519, before the Reformation came to Zurich, the plague broke out. About 1 in 4 persons died. Zwingli had remained in the city to fulfill his pastoral duties as a Catholic priest. He fell ill but survived. During his illness and recovery, he wrote his Plague Song (Pestlied) which included these words:
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“Thy purpose fulfil:
nothing can be too severe for me.
I am thy vessel,
for you to make whole or break to pieces.
Since, if you take hence
my spirit from this earth,
you do it so that it will not grow evil,
and will not mar
the pious lives of others.”
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Zwingli worked for reform in Zurich and elsewhere in Switzerland. He preached and wrote, married and had a family, bumped heads with Martin Luther over the doctrine of the Real Presence in Communion, helped to suppress the Anabaptist movement in Zurich, went to war for religious and national autonomy, and was killed in battle.
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“Zwingli had considered himself first and foremost a soldier of Christ; second a defender of his country, the Confederation; and third a leader of his city, Zurich, where he had lived for the previous twelve years. Ironically, he died at the age of 47, not for Christ nor for the Confederation, but for Zurich.” (Wikipedia)
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