Go read! Spurgeon’s view of eschatology



Revelation 20:1-6

NASB
Satan Bound

20 Then I saw an angel coming down from heaven, holding the key of the abyss and a great chain [a]in his hand. And he laid hold of the dragon, the serpent of old, who is the devil and Satan, and bound him for a thousand years; and he threw him into the abyss, and shut it and sealed it over him, so that he would not deceive the nations any longer, until the thousand years were completed; after these things he must be released for a short time.

Then I saw thrones, and they sat on them, and judgment was given to them. And I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded because of [b]their testimony of Jesus and because of the word of God, and those who had not worshiped the beast or his image, and had not received the mark on their forehead and on their hand; and they came to life and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were completed. This is the first resurrection. Blessed and holy is the one who has a part in the first resurrection; over these the second death has no power, but they will be priests of God and of Christ and will reign with Him for a thousand years.


THE MILLENNIAL POSITION OF SPURGEON

Dennis M. Swanson
Seminary Librarian, The Master’s Seminary Journal

Spurgeon2“The notoriety of Charles Haddon Spurgeon has caused many since his time to claim him as a supporter of their individual views regarding the millennium. Spurgeon and his contemporaries were familiar with the four current millennial views – amillennialism, postmillennialism, historic premillennialism, and dispensational premillennialism – though the earlier nomenclature may have differed. Spurgeon did not preach or write extensively on prophetic themes, but in his sermons and writings he did say enough to produce a clear picture of his position. Despite claims to the contrary, his position was most closely identifiable with that of historic premillennialism in teaching the church would experience the tribulation, the millennial kingdom would be the culmination of God’s program for the church, a thousand years would separate the resurrection of the just from that of the unjust, and the Jews in the kingdom would be part of the one people of God with the church. . .”


 

12 thoughts on “Go read! Spurgeon’s view of eschatology

  1. QUOTES FROM THE ARTICLE:

    1. Was Spurgeon a Dispensational Premillennialist?

    “[Charles] Ryrie specifies, ‘The essence of dispensationalism, then, is the distinction of Israel and the Church.’ Spurgeon rejected any notion that separated the people of God. In a clear reference to the teaching of dispensationalists, he explained,

    ‘We have even heard it asserted that those who lived before the coming of Christ do not belong to the church of God! . . . These who saw Christ’s day before it came, had a great difference as to what they knew, and perhaps in the same measure a difference as to what they enjoyed while on earth meditating upon Christ; but they were all washed in the same blood, all redeemed with the same ransom price, and made members of the same body. Israel in the covenant of grace is not natural Israel, but all believers in all ages.’. . .

    “Spurgeon’s views on eschatology were not consistent with a dispensational understanding of premillennialism.”

    2) Whas Spurgeon an Historical Premillennialist?

    “Key features of historic premillennialism are twofold: (1) the kingdom will be the culmination of the church age and (2) the ‘rapture’ will follow the tribulation, with the church going through the tribulation under the protection of God. Spurgeon fits most consistently into the ‘historic or covenantal premillennial’ system… The reasons for this conclusion are the following: First, Spurgeon believed that the church would go through the totality of the tribulation, but be protected.

    “‘The burning earth shall be the torch to light up the wedding procession; the quivering of the heavens shall be, as it were, but as a dancing of the feet of angels in those glorious festivities, and the booming and crashing of the elements shall, somehow, only help to swell the outburst of praise unto God the just and terrible, who is to our exceeding joy.’…

    “Second, Spurgeon felt that the millennial kingdom was the culmination of God’s program for the church: ‘The vehemence of your desire for the destruction of evil and the setting up of the kingdom of Christ will drive you to that grand hope of the church, and make you cry out for its fulfillment.’

    “Third, Spurgeon believed that there would be two separate resurrections, one of the just and one of the unjust, separated by the millennium:…

    “Fourth, Spurgeon taught that though the Jews would return to their land and Messiah would reign over them, they would come to faith in Christ just as the church and would be part of the church:

    “[He said] ‘These who saw Christ’s day before it came, had a great difference as to what they knew, and perhaps in the same measure a difference as to what they enjoyed while on earth meditating upon Christ; but they were all washed in the same blood, all redeemed with the same ransom price, and made members of the same body. Israel in the covenant of grace is not natural Israel, but all believers in all ages.’…

    “All the evidence demonstrates that Charles Haddon Spurgeon most certainly held to a premillennial eschatology. Furthermore, his millennial views coincided most closely with the ‘historic’ or ‘covenantal’ view of premillennialism, a position he held firmly throughout his entire ministry. The understanding of the premillennial return of Christ was of such great import to Spurgeon and his ministry that he stressed,

    “‘Brethren, no truth ought to be more frequently proclaimed, next to the first coming of the Lord, than his second coming; and you cannot thoroughly set forth all of the ends and bearings of the first advent if you forget the second. At the Lord’s Supper, there is no discerning the Lord’s body unless you discern his first coming; but there is no drinking into his cup to its fulness, unless you hear him say, ‘Until I Come.’ You must look forward, as well as backward. So it must be with all our ministries; they must look to him on the cross and on the throne. We must vividly realize that he, who has once come, is coming yet again, or else our testimony will be marred, and one-sided. We shall make lame work of preaching and teaching if we leave out either advent.'”

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