Quote of the day – Fleeing the City of Destruction



Luke 17:24,30-33

NASB

24 For just like the lightning, when it flashes out of one part of the sky, shines to the other part of the sky, so will the Son of Man be in His day. . .

30 It will be just the same on the day that the Son of Man is revealed. 31 On that day, the one who is on the housetop and whose goods are in the house must not go down to take them out; and likewise the one who is in the field must not turn back. 32 Remember Lot’s wife. 33 Whoever seeks to keep his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life will preserve it.

1 John 2:15-17

15 Do not love the world nor the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. 16 For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life, is not from the Father, but is from the world. 17 The world is passing away, and also its lusts; but the one who does the will of God lives forever.

2 Corinthians 13:5

Test yourselves to see if you are in the faith; examine yourselves! Or do you not recognize this about yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you—unless indeed you fail the test?


 

Thoughts

According to his short work “Fleeing Out of Sodom,” Jonathan Edwards saw Sodom and its utter destruction as a type for this age and its impending judgment.

Reading his words was convicting. Yes, I believe God’s Word, which declares:

For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast. 

Ephesians 2

Knowing this, I avoid certain kinds of reading, but also knowing that we’re to examine ourselves to see if we are in the faith, I read Edwards’ work. Puritans didn’t soft-peddle things, and Edwards has been called “the last Puritan.” His words strongly motivated me to examine myself again to learn whether like Lot’s wife I’m looking back to and longing for this earthly city and its things.

Something noteworthy happened yesterday. While half-asleep, we were startled by the doorbell and Greta’s barking. I wasn’t prepared for visitors and in light of my reading this sudden jolt reminded me that we do not know how long we have to live nor the day or the hour of the Lord’s Return (Mark 13:32).

Let’s take this to heart. I believe that many of my readers already do.

(I used the title “Fleeing the City of Destruction” because of Bunyan’s use of this in Pilgrim’s Progress.)


“. . . there is no place of safety in Sodom, nor in all the plain on which Sodom is built. The mountain of safety is before us, and not behind us.”

Jonathan Edwards

Fleeing Out of Sodom

(pdf file)

Chapel Library


For more about Jonathan Edwards, please go to Theopedia.


Psalm 119:37-40

37 Turn away my eyes from looking at vanity,
And revive me in Your ways.
38 Establish Your word to Your servant,
As that which produces reverence for You.
39 Turn away my reproach which I dread,
For Your ordinances are good.
40 Behold, I long for Your precepts;
Revive me through Your righteousness.


 

27 thoughts on “Quote of the day – Fleeing the City of Destruction

  1. “Knowing that we’re to examine ourselves to be sure that we are in the faith, I read Edwards work.” Maria, I’m not being facetious, but the thought occurs to me: why would one who believes that they are chosen need to be sure of their salvation. Your stated position requires God to do the making sure, doesn’t it? Does this examining ourselves not imply free will?

    Like

      • Not sure that I get the distinction between Grace to man who chooses to hear and to follow vs grace to the man or woman who He chose? In either case would His grace not apply? Obviously He extends much grace to any sinner who repents as David did when confronted vs no grace to Saul who did not repent when confronted buy Samuel. Or at least it would appear that way.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jerry,

          There is a definite difference, though both see the necessity of God’s grace. (Even Catholics see the necessity of God’s grace, grace mediated through their sacraments.) One belief is known as synergism, man cooperating with God to be saved, helping to save himself; the other is known as monergism, in which God alone saves. “‘She will bear a Son; and you shall call His name Jesus, for He will save His people from their sins.’” (Matthew 1:21)

          From Theopedia:

          “Monergism (Greek mono meaning ‘one’ and erg meaning ‘work’) is a term for the belief that the Holy Spirit is the only agent who effects regeneration of Christians. This view, held by Reformed and Calvinistic groups, sees salvation as the work of God alone, from first to last.”

          “Synergism, in general, may be defined as two or more agents working together to produce a result not obtainable by any of the agents independently. The word synergy or synergism comes from two Greek words, erg meaning to work and syn meaning together, hence synergism is a ‘working together.'”

          Like

    • Jerry,

      You wrote, “Maria, I’m not being facetious, but the thought occurs to me: why would one who believes that they are chosen need to be sure of their salvation. Your stated position requires God to do the making sure, doesn’t it? Does this examining ourselves not imply free will?”

      I don’t believe you’re being facetious but that you’re trying to move me away from what I know God’s Word teaches.

      To examine ourselves is obedience, right? If the Lord tells us to do something, that is, to examine ourselves to see if we are in the faith – and He did this through Paul – then we must obey for He is Lord. We can’t be presumptuous in light of His loving warnings.

      The Lord made our salvation certain and He will finish the good work He began in us, willing and working in us His good pleasure.

      Jerry, where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. Our will is no longer in bondage to sin but free to do what the Lord wants, His will, that which is good, acceptable and perfect.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I am not sure but I thought “test yourself to see if you are in the faith” was about finding out wether one is a true believer or not.
    How do you see it Maria?

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Hi Maria❤
    I think I misunderstood this paragraph

    “Knowing this, I avoid certain kinds of reading, but also knowing that we’re to examine ourselves to see if we are in the faith, I read Edwards’ work. Puritans didn’t soft-peddle things, and Edwards has been called “the last Puritan.” His words strongly motivated me to examine myself again to learn whether like Lot’s wife I’m looking back to and longing for this earthly city and its things”
    That’s why I was asking. I have so much to learn.

    Liked by 1 person

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